Brain News You Can Use | February 2019

Brain News You Can Use – Our Top Picks That Caught Our Eye this Month:

 

5 Proven Tips to Quickly Boost Your Memory | The search for substances that improve cognitive function —or “nootropics”—has surged over the last several years as consumers strive to enhance their attention, memory, and daily productivity. (Source: Psychology Today | Michelle Braun Ph.D.).

Be Better About Brain Health in 2019 | Did you know that Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the third leading cause of death in San Diego? (Source: CBS8 | Jarrett Wright). 

Exercise May Prevent Against Alzheimer’s Disease: Study | Exercise produces a hormone that may improve memory and protect against Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study. Researchers have previously discovered a hormone called irisin that is released into the circulation during physical activity. (Source: timenownews.com | N.A.).

How Living With a 50-50 Chance of Alzheimer’s by 50 Affects Your Views on Brain Health | As a college student, Marty Reiswig decided to take his girlfriend to a family reunion. After he noticed many of his relatives struggling with everyday tasks like pulling out a chair, Reiswig decided to take a closer look at his family’s history with early-onset Alzheimer’s. (Source: beingpatient.com | Christine Barba).

Sleep Loss Encourages Spread of Toxic Alzheimer’s Protein | In addition to memory loss and confusion, many people with Alzheimer’s disease have trouble sleeping. Now an NIH-funded team of researchers has evidence that the reverse is also true: a chronic lack of sleep may worsen the disease and its associated memory loss. (Source: National Institute on Aging | Dr. Francis Collins).

Supplement Makers Touting Cures for Alzheimer’s and Other Diseases Get F.D.A. Warning | The Food and Drug Administration on Monday warned 12 sellers of dietary supplements to stop claiming their products can cure diseases ranging from Alzheimer’s to cancer to diabetes. (Source: NY Times | Sheila Kaplan). 

 

For more brain health information, see our February Newsletter.

 

 

2019-02-20T19:16:05-04:00